The Supreme Court recently ruled that aggregate contribution limits to political candidates are unconstitutional. Although we are disappointed by this outcome, we will continue to push for real-time transparency of hard money contributions.

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2Day in #OpenGov 10/11/12

by

NEWS ROUNDUP:

Government

  • More fallout from wasteful spending: Several lawmakers are calling for the removal of a Department of Veterans Affairs employee after an investigation found more than $700,000 in unauthorized or wasteful spending by the agency. One official has already resigned as a result of the findings. (Washington Post)
  • Stimulus spending questioned: A group of House Republicans is questioning stimulus spending that was sent to a British company to test U.S. broadband Internet speeds. The FCC called the questions an attack on transparency, saying that measuring Internet speed is key to increasing access for people across the country. (The Hill)

Campaign finance

  • Campaign contributions limits reinstated: A federal appeals court reinstated campaign contribution limits in Montana after a federal judge's decision last week opened the floodgates.  Montana has been the center of campaign finance tests since the Citizens United decision. (Washington Post)
  • DeLay appeal pending: An appeals court has heard arguments in a campaign finance case involving former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay. He is appealing being convicted of money-laundering in the 2002 elections. (Houston Chronicle)
Lobbying
  • Changes on K Street: Rob Epplin, the former legislative director for Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), has joined Gephardt Government Affairs as vice president. The move is one of several changes in positions or the structure of lobby shops on K Street recently. (Roll Call)
  • Lobbying with government ties: A slew of former Congressional staffers and government employees are taking on new projects in their lobbying life. (The Hill)
International
  • Conviction handed down in corruption case: The Brazilian Supreme Court has decided a top aide to former Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva is guilty of corruption. The aide was convicted of paying lawmakers to vote in favor of the president's agenda items. (Wall Street Journal)

RELEVANT BILLS INTRODUCED:
  • None
HAPPENING TODAY 10/11: 

JOB OPPORTUNITIES:

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