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2Day in #OpenGov 2/14/2012

by PolicyFellow

Policy Fellow Matt Rumsey wrote this post.

Here is Tuesday's take on transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events.

News Roundup:

Campaign Finance
  • Most Republican presidential candidates have declined to disclose the identities of their bundlers. (Yahoo/AP)
  • At least four Cabinet secretaries have signaled their willingness to participate in activities aimed at helping Democratic super PACs raise money. (iWatch News)
  • The Obama administration's 2013 budget proposal does not include a previously considered plan to require contractors to disclose political contributions when submitting contract bids. (Federal Computer Week)

Government

International
  • India is the first major democratic country to request that internet companies institute sweeping content filtering policies. Google, Facebook Twitter, and other companies are slated to present plans for filtering "offensive content" by February 21. (Global Voices)
  • Brazil, a co-chair of the OGP, is scheduled to host a meeting of more than 50 participating countries in April. But, they have struggled to secure broad citizen participation in their own OGP plans. (Observing Brazil)

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 2/14:

  • None.

Relevant bills introduced:

  • None.
Transparency events scheduled for 2/14:

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