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This Week in Conflicts: Trump’s Attempts to Undermine Investigations into His Presidency and an In-Depth Look at Tom Barrack

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This week, The New York Times outlines how President Donald Trump has tried to undermine investigations into his presidency, the latest episode of Trump, Inc. takes an in-depth look at Tom Barrack and Democrats launch an investigation into how White House officials handled a proposal to transfer nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia.

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This Week in Conflicts: Details on Trump Tower Moscow Deal, Pruitt Escapes Investigations and the Trump Foundation Lawsuit Moves Forward

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This week, new details emerge about the plans for a Trump Tower in Moscow, reports show investigations into Scott Pruitt, the former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), have ended due to his resignation, and a judge has ruled the New York Attorney General’s lawsuit against the Trump Foundation can proceed.

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This Week in Conflicts: A Misconduct Roundup, Photographer Admits Editing Inauguration Photos and Top House Dem. Threatens Investigations

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This week, the New York Times highlights crimes and ethical violations associated with President Donald Trump’s administration, a government photographer admits to editing photos from the president’s inauguration and a top Democrat threatens investigations into President Trump if Democrats take control of the U.S House of Representatives.

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National Archives publishes online dashboard of its investigations into lost, altered or destroyed public records

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In spring 2018, for the first time the National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) has begun using the Internet to inform the American public about its ongoing investigations of unauthorized dispositions in an online dashboard. In a year that continues to be marked by regression on open government, this is a welcome development that shines a bright light on a matter of significant public concern.

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Today in OpenGov: Accelerating investigations

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This week, Congress returns from its August break and several committees are expected to devote renewed energy to investigations into Russia's involvement in the 2016 election. Read on for more on that story, plus the latest open government news from Washington, around the United States, and across the globe.

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OpenGov Voices: Innovative Investigations — How a Watchdog Group Uses the FOIA Process to Push the Limits of Transparency

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed by the guest blogger and those providing comments are theirs alone and do not reflect the opinions of the Sunlight Foundation or any employee thereof. Sunlight Foundation is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information within the Mary-Beth-Hutchins-Cause-of-Action_Thumbnailguest blog. Mary Beth Hutchins is the Communications Director at Cause of Action. Prior to joining Cause of Action, Hutchins spent several years at an Alexandria, VA-based public relations firm where she managed press outreach for a number of national non-profit groups. The need for government transparency has never been greater than it is right now and at Cause of Action, we’re working to make sure it happens. As a nonprofit government accountability organization, Cause of Action works to expose cronyism, waste, fraud and mismanagement in the federal government through a combination of investigations, education and litigation. With our staff of investigators, lawyers and communications professionals committed to government transparency, Cause of Action frequently uses Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to shed light on otherwise opaque facets of the Federal Government.

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New TARP watchdog report cites poor progress and several fraud investigations

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The Office of the Special Inspector General of the Troubles Asset Relief Program (SIGTARP) released a quarterly report today stating that although, Wall Street is beginning to regain its footing, Main Street has been showing “disturbingly persistent” signs of distress. 

While, TARP recipients have paid back $180.8 billion, taxpayers are still expected to shoulder a $127 billion loss. The losses incurred come from the $50 billion given to AIG, the $31 billion to the automotive industry and $49 to the housing market. 

According to the report even though "the financial system appears to be stabilizing and record profits are ...

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